Transaction ACID properties

A database transaction is a sequence of actions that are treated as a single unit of work. These actions should either complete entirely or take no effect at all. Transaction management is an important part of RDBMS-oriented enterprise application to ensure data integrity and consistency. The concept of transactions can be described with the following four key properties described as ACID −

  • Atomicity − A transaction should be treated as a single unit of operation, which means either the entire sequence of operations is successful or unsuccessful.
  • Consistency − This represents the consistency of the referential integrity of the database, unique primary keys in tables, etc.
  • Isolation − There may be many transaction processing with the same data set at the same time. Each transaction should be isolated from others to prevent data corruption.
  • Durability − Once a transaction has completed, the results of this transaction have to be made permanent and cannot be erased from the database due to system failure.
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MongoDB : How to write Stored Procedures in MongoDB

The first thing you need to know is that MongoDB stored procedures are written in JavaScript. This feels pretty strange at first, but in actual fact it’s far more satisfying to program in a real language than in any of those vendor-specific SQL-based concoctions. It’s also very powerful: MongoDB uses the same JavaScript runtime as FireFox, so you have pretty much every feature of the language, including closures, Iterators and XML support via E4X.

So in MongoDB, a stored procedure is really just a JavaScript function, which must be stored in a special collection named db.system.js. Imagine a simple function like so:

function addNumbers( x , y ) {
    return x + y;
}

To convert that to a stored proc, just insert it into db.system.js:

> db.system.js.save({_id:"addNumbers", value:function(x, y){ return x + y; }});

Stored procs can be viewed, altered and deleted in the same way as any document in any collection, as that’s all they are. So we can check that our code was successfully stored by using a simple find():

> db.system.js.find()
{ "_id" : "addNumbers", "value" : function cf__3__f_(x, y) {
    return x + y;
} }

Ignore the machine-generated function name. That looks good, and we can start to actually use the proc. That’s done using db.eval():

> db.eval('addNumbers(17, 25)');
42

That’s all pretty simple, I think.

Python : Dictionary comprehension

Before updating a no sql or mongo doc you need to ensure that you are not adding keys which are not part of initial doc then dictionary comprehension is really helpful.

What it means, is you are able to create a dict (json object) dynamically in single line of code using loops, condition, construction every thing together.

Single line comprehension

items_to_update = {key: value for key, value in payload.items() if key in req_items}

 

multi line interpretation

if key in req_items:

….for key, value in payload.items():

…….. dictionary[key]=value

Detailed example of created update doc dic before inserting in mongo db

try:
    req_items = ["property1","property2"]
    items_to_update = {key: value for key, value in payload.items() if key in req_items}
  
    if items_to_update:
        logger.info("Updating device collection with {}".format(items_to_update))
        self.db.update({"filter": filter}, {"$set": items_to_update}, multi=True)
        logger.info("Successfully updated product details")
except PyMongoError as e:
    logger.critical('Pymongo Exception {}'.format(str(e)))
except Exception as e:
    logger.critical('Exception {}'.format(str(e)))

 

asd

Mongodb – can’t login via -u root -p bitnami

Are you trying to login like this?

mongo admin --username root --password YOUR_PASSWORD

where YOUR_PASSWORD is the one you can see in your AWS system log:

Setting Bitnami application password to 'YOUR_PASSWORD'

If this doesn’t work, you can also try resetting MongoDB password:

http://wiki.bitnami.com/Components/mongoDB?highlight=mongo#How_to_reset_the_MongoDB_root_password.3f

MongoDb : Case in-sensative search using pymongo

As we all know Json is case sensitive and so is MongoDB, hence searching same name which got save in different case might not return any result. The solution is to do case in-sensative search.

Below is the example of pymongo

db.users.find_one({'name': re.compile(username, re.IGNORECASE)})

MongoDB : Java program to do basic crud operation

Sample Java program to connect MongoDb and perform Crud Operations.

Copy paste, run and learn 😉

note :- Please ensure you have installed mongo dependency using jar, github or mvn

 

package com.premaseem.core;

import com.mongodb.*;

import java.util.Date;

/**
 * Java + MongoDB Crud operation example
 *
 */
public class App {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        try {

            /**** Connect to MongoDB ****/
            // Since 2.10.0, uses MongoClient
            MongoClient mongo = new MongoClient("localhost", 27017);

            // or, to connect to a replica set, with auto-discovery of the primary, supply a seed list of members
//            MongoClient mongoClient = new MongoClient(Arrays.asList(new ServerAddress("localhost", 27017),
//                    new ServerAddress("localhost", 27018),
//                    new ServerAddress("localhost", 27019)));

            /**** Get database ****/
            // if database doesn't exists, MongoDB will create it for you
            DB db = mongo.getDB("testdb");

            /**** Get collection / table from 'testdb' ****/
            // if collection doesn't exists, MongoDB will create it for you
            DBCollection table = db.getCollection("user");

            /**** Insert ****/
            // create a document to store key and value
            BasicDBObject document = new BasicDBObject();
            document.put("name", "premaseem");
            document.put("age", 30);
            document.put("createdDate", new Date());
            table.insert(document);

            /**** Find and display ****/
            BasicDBObject searchQuery = new BasicDBObject();
            searchQuery.put("name", "premaseem");

            DBCursor cursor = table.find(searchQuery);

            while (cursor.hasNext()) {
                System.out.println(cursor.next());
            }

            /**** Update ****/
            // search document where name="premaseem" and update it with new values
            BasicDBObject query = new BasicDBObject();
            query.put("name", "premaseem");

            BasicDBObject newDocument = new BasicDBObject();
            newDocument.put("name", "premaseem-updated");

            BasicDBObject updateObj = new BasicDBObject();
            updateObj.put("$set", newDocument);

            table.update(query, updateObj);

            /**** Find and display ****/
            BasicDBObject searchQuery2
                    = new BasicDBObject().append("name", "premaseem-updated");

            DBCursor cursor2 = table.find(searchQuery2);

            while (cursor2.hasNext()) {
                System.out.println(cursor2.next());
            }

            /**** Done ****/
            System.out.println("Done");

        }  catch (MongoException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}